fbpx
Please rotate your device
YES
NO
TO PROTECT YOURSELF AND THE COMMUNITY, PLEASE FOLLOW ALL GOVERNMENT GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19 AND BE MINDFUL OF OTHERS WHEN VIEWING CIRCA.
COVID19 GUIDELINES
PLAY

The public call out for the inaugural CIRCA x Dazed Class of 2021 initiative asked audiences to submit a 2.5 minute film in response to the theme ‘Communion’ set by interdisciplinary artist and lecturer, Angel Rose. After receiving 2,000 applications, we are proud to present the 30 finalists who will each receive access to the Dazed Space and have their work exhibited as part of the CIRCA programme, appearing across public screens in London, Tokyo and Seoul this September.

Expanding on their commitment to help support the talent of tomorrow, CIRCA and Dazed appointed a community of jurors including Cauleen Smith, Frank Lebon, Hugo Comte, Simone Rocha, Dexter Navy, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Michele Lamy to select their top 5 submissions. From this, one lucky finalist will be selected by world renowned performance artist Marina Abramović to receive the #CIRCAECONOMY cash prize of £30,000.

With public art spaces diminishing, investment in arts education being cut and artist communities at risk, this joint initiative aims to empower the next generation of artists working in moving-image by platforming new voices and points of view from local communities on a global level, giving them unrivalled media exposure and the tools to help kick start their careers.

How did you become an artist and what was your route to your current practice?

MOJMIR BURES:
VHS used to be my favourite toy in childhood. I liked recording the daily routine of my life. This experience turned into a fascination with photography and the medium of film. Just a bit later I became obsessed with capturing people, objects, shapes and shadows. I began studying Art from the age of fifteen and have continued ever since. At my BA studies I finally started to explore my visual style and started to look for photographic topics. With most of them that I still deal with even today. One of my big dreams came true after finishing BA when I got invited to the prestigious Royal College of Art, London. I lived and worked there for three years. But soon I found myself in a world that was foreign to me, and my real home became more and more distant from me. I realized I look at the rest of the world through the eyes of a stranger and I found inspiration in that. My work conception deals with the current social topics of coexistence of man and territory since then.

Art attracted me from an early age as well. I dare to say that I started to understand it much better when I met my teacher photographer and artist Libuše Jarcovjaková, who inspired me not only with her subjective documentary photographs shot mostly during the communist era, but also with her life path and authentic stories. Subsequently, it was also Peter Kennard, with whom I studied in London, and whose radically critical approach appealed to me and inspired me to reconsider my own artistic body of work.

What inspires you to make your work?

MOJMIR BURES:
Currently, my biggest inspiration is my son Sebastian, my wife Olga, and family and friends who still believe in what I do. I also source my inspiration in books, paintings and movies. I like to be controlled by quiet places, the forest, the light.

Can you identify any elements of your community or collaborators that have had a strong influence?

MOJMIR BURES:
During the three years of living abroad without a family, I realized how rare direct human contact, spoken word, eye contact and other subtle nuances of the body are. That is why I believe that the human need – coexistence, sharing time and space – is an essential element of any community. Freedom, creativity, originality, identity, discussion; are factors that I and my community require. I believe that the main element of my community is curiosity, knowledge and sharing.

Would you consider your practice to have a positive social impact, and if so in what way?

MOJMIR BURES:
I would like my project “Imagine” to be seen as a symbolic expression of peace and a balance between rival territories. I dream of making an art that opens a discussion or perhaps just helps to realize that any conflict can have a solution.

Can you identify any elements of your community or collaborators that have had a strong influence?

MOJMIR BURES:
During the three years of living abroad without a family, I realized how rare direct human contact, spoken word, eye contact and other subtle nuances of the body are. That is why I believe that the human need – coexistence, sharing time and space – is an essential element of any community. Freedom, creativity, originality, identity, discussion; are factors that I and my community require. I believe that the main element of my community is curiosity, knowledge and sharing.

Would you consider your practice to have a positive social impact, and if so in what way?

MOJMIR BURES:
I would like my project “Imagine” to be seen as a symbolic expression of peace and a balance between rival territories. I dream of making an art that opens a discussion or perhaps just helps to realize that any conflict can have a solution.

How is your project tied to the Circa x Dazed Class of 20:21 theme of ‘Communion’?:

MOJMIR BURES:
This video, titled “Imagine” I have used a photograph taken by “Anas Baba” which became historically significant immediately. The chosen photograph depicts the night sky with the rockets and counter rockets. I have made a digital collage, where I removed all the weapons and therefore reshaped the image back to the ordinary calm night. With this simple symbolic manipulation I am creating a new land and new fictional communities living in peace. I do not consider this video as political or religious but rather as a reminder of peace and freedom it used to have before the tragic events.

Has your work been recognised by any public bodies or organisations in the past?

MOJMIR BURES:
No

How would the #CIRCAECONOMY prize of £30,000 impact your future practice?

MOJMIR BURES:
Dramatically! I definitely want to expand and continue my practice and look for topics that will resonate among society. By studying and living in England, the finances for my personal work were
very limited and unfortunately for economic reasons I could not afford to create according to my own ideas.

What would you do with the money?

MOJMIR BURES:
Partly to repay a loan that I had to take out to study abroad, which is a great financial burden for me and my family. However, I would invest most of it in new works, ideas and inspiration.

If you are awarded the #CIRCAECONOMY prize, how might this affect your community?

MOJMIR BURES:
I hope that the project I created could resonate in my artistic community and that it could become a catalyst for creating new communities. Communities that respect diversity, communities that are able to discuss and find solutions.