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David Hockney, ‘Remember that you cannot look at the sun or death for very long’, 2021

In a letter to BBC arts editor Will Gompertz, Hockney said: “I began drawing the winter trees on a new iPad. Then this virus started…
"I went on drawing the winter trees that eventually burst into blossom. This is the stage we are right now. Meanwhile the virus is going mad, and many people said my drawings were a great respite from what was going on."

He added: "Why are my iPad drawings seen as a respite from the news? Well, they are obviously made by the hand depicting the renewal that is the spring in this part of the world."

This latest series of images, including "Do remember, they can't cancel the Spring", are the product of him looking directly at nature and representing what he sees by capturing his sensory reaction on paper via a pencil, rather than using a camera and a photograph. They are Hockney’s record of how he uniquely experiences nature and the subject, and can’t help but brighten up your day.

"TWILIGHT"

Twilight on Earth is the illumination of the lower atmosphere when the Sun is not directly visible because it is below the horizon. Twilight is produced by sunlight scattering in the upper atmosphere, illuminating the lower atmosphere so that Earth's surface is neither completely lit nor completely dark. The word twilight is also used to denote the periods of time when this illumination occurs.

Owing to its distinctive quality, primarily the absence of shadows and the appearance of objects silhouetted against the lit sky, twilight has long been popular with photographers, who sometimes refer to it as "sweet light", and painters, who often refer to it as the blue hour, after the French expression l'heure bleue.