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David Hockney, ‘Remember that you cannot look at the sun or death for very long’, 2021

Throughout the pandemic, Hockney has been preparing for his next major exhibition, which will open at London’s Royal Academy next year. David Hockney: The Arrival of Spring, Normandy, 2020 will open exactly a year after the works were made during the pandemic and celebrate the unfolding of spring, from start to end.  
This new body of work features 116 works that have been ‘painted’ on the iPad and then printed onto paper, with Hockney overseeing all aspects of production.
As Hockney himself notes: working on the iPad requires the ability to draw and paint. Each work has been printed far larger than the screen on which it was created to allow you to see every mark and stroke of the artist’s hand.

Impression, Sunrise (French: Impression, soleil levant) is a painting by Claude Monet first shown at what would become known as the "Exhibition of the Impressionists" in Paris in April, 1874. The painting is credited with inspiring the name of the Impressionist movement.

Impression, Sunrise depicts the port of Le Havre at sunrise, the two small rowboats in the foreground and the red Sun being the focal elements. In the middle ground, more fishing boats are included, while in the background on the left side of the painting are clipper ships with tall masts. Behind them are other misty shapes that "are not trees but smokestacks of pack boats and steamships, while on the right in the distance are other masts and chimneys silhouetted against the sky."[4] In order to show these features of industry, Monet eliminated existing houses on the left side of the jetty, leaving the background unobscured.