fbpx
Please rotate your device
YES
NO
TO PROTECT YOURSELF AND THE COMMUNITY, PLEASE FOLLOW ALL GOVERNMENT GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19 AND BE MINDFUL OF OTHERS WHEN VIEWING CIRCA.
COVID19 GUIDELINES
PLAY

Nikita Gale, SOME WEATHER (Rain), 2021
__

CIRCA:
Most of us have been isolated at home for long periods of time over the past year, and now we’re starting to come outside and see art in public spaces. How is public art today even more important?

ZOÉ WHITLEY:
I think public access to art has always been important but like Joni Mitchell, and later Janet Jackson, sang, “don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got til it’s gone.” I think we all have a newfound enthusiasm and appreciation for in-real-life experiences and gathering together.

READ

"The Sonic Color Line", Jennifer Lynn Stoever, 2016

Race is a visual phenomenon, the ability to see “difference.” At least that is what conventional wisdom has lead us to believe. Yet, The Sonic Color Line argues that American ideologies of white supremacy are just as dependent on what we hear—voices, musical taste, volume—as they are on skin color or hair texture. Reinforcing compelling new ideas about the relationship between race and sound with meticulous historical research, Jennifer Lynn Stoever helps us to better understand how sound and listening not only register the racial politics of our world, but actively produce them. Through analysis of the historical traces of sounds of African American performers, Stoever reveals a host of racialized aural representations operating at the level of the unseen—the sonic color line—and exposes the racialized listening practices she figures as “the listening ear.”

LISTEN