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Nikita Gale, SOME WEATHER (Fog), 2021
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CIRCA:
What is it that draws you to music and sound in your work?

NIKITA GALE:
Sound is messy. R. Murray Schaeffer refers to sensing sound as “a way of touching at a distance and the intimacy of [touch] is fused with sociability whenever people gather together...” which is a definition I’ve always loved because in very succinct terms it points to the sensual and haptic quality of sound which is what makes it so ambivalent as a medium. It’s the pleasure and anxiety of being touched by something that you can’t sense until it’s touching you. Like, the title of that Drake album slightly different: “If You’re [Hearing] This It’s Too Late.”

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"Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom" by Daphne A Brooks, 2006

In Bodies in Dissent Daphne A. Brooks argues that from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth, black transatlantic activists, actors, singers, and other entertainers frequently transformed the alienating conditions of social and political marginalization into modes of self-actualization through performance. Brooks considers the work of African American, Anglo, and racially ambiguous performers in a range of popular entertainment, including racial melodrama, spectacular theatre, moving panorama exhibitions, Pan-Africanist musicals, Victorian magic shows, religious and secular song, spiritualism, and dance. She describes how these entertainers experimented with different ways of presenting their bodies in public—through dress, movement, and theatrical technologies—to defamiliarize the spectacle of “blackness” in the transatlantic imaginary.

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