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Nikita Gale, SOME WEATHER (Blizzard), 2021
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CIRCA:
Do you think the art world has changed since the beginning of the pandemic? And if so, how?

ZOÉ WHITLEY:
I’ve noticed considerably more professional openness and vulnerability. Individuals for whom expertise might once have been more of an impenetrable suit of armour had to admit they didn’t have all the answers, ask for help and work with other people. We’ve all had to learn from one another and it’s led to greater transparency and adaptability.

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"White Tears", by Hari Kunzru, 2017

From one of the most talented fiction writers at work today: two ambitious young musicians are drawn into the dark underworld of blues record collecting, haunted by the ghosts of a repressive past.

Two twenty-something New Yorkers. Seth is awkward and shy. Carter is glamorous and the heir to one of America's great fortunes. They have one thing in common: an obsession with music. Seth is desperate to reach for the future. Carter is slipping back into the past. When Seth accidentally records an unknown singer in a park, Carter sends it out over the Internet, claiming it's a long lost 1920s blues recording by a musician called Charlie Shaw. When an old collector contacts them to say that their fake record and their fake bluesman are actually real, the two young white men, accompanied by Carter's troubled sister Leonie, spiral down into the heart of the nation's darkness, encountering a suppressed history of greed, envy, revenge, and exploitation.

White Tears is a ghost story, a terrifying murder mystery, a timely meditation on race, and a love letter to all the forgotten geniuses of American music.

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