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Portraits from the Joseon Dynasty were characterised by their detail. The efforts to realistically depict every hair and wrinkle on their faces, and accurately render the transparencies of the headwear and the patterns and folds of their robes, are evident in every corner of the painting.

The below painting shows Sin Sukju, a Korean politician and Priminister during Joseon Dynasty, dressed in his official robes with a black silk hat on his head. In accordance with Korean portraiture conventions, court artists pictured subjects like Sin Sukju seated in a full-length view, often with their heads turned slightly and only one ear showing. Crisp, angular lines and subtle gradations of color characterize the folds of his gown. Here, the subject is seated in a folding chair with cabriole-style arms, where the upper part is convex and the bottom part is concave. Leather shoes adorn his feet, which rest on an intricately carved wooden footstool. In proper decorum, his hands are folded neatly and concealed within his sleeves. He wears a rank badge on his chest.

It was Sin Sukju's service to Prince Anpyeong that earned Sin Sukju a significant place in the history of art. In 1445, Sin Sukju compiled Hwagi (Commentaries on Painting), which contains a catalogue of Prince Anpyeong’s collection of paintings. Sin Sukju’s detailed records revealed the prince’s interest in Chinese paintings and his patronage of the Joseon court painter, An Gyeon, of whom Sojung Jun takes reference in Green Screen. An Gyeon was professionally active as an artist for 30 years beginning in approximately 1440. Sin Sukju's commentaries have helped scholars to identify specific works and prompted speculation on the cultural exchange between China and Korea.