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CIRCA:
How did you go about translating the multi-perspectival outlook of Mongyudowondo into the work for CIRCA?

SOJUNG JUN:
The two works, Green Screen and Early Arrival of Future, create a non-linear temporal intersection within the timeline of CIRCA. The two works take the specific time and space of CIRCA as an apparatus to look into the present, while going back and forth between dream and reality, past and future. In particular, Green Screen pays attention to the politicity and flexibility of the glitches and deterioration that occurs during transmission, acceleration, and circulation of digital images. Using this focus as a methodology, the work rejects a singular and stagnant scenery. At the same time, it raises a question on the operations that extend from the internal perspectives looking at the border to the external gazes, by using various gestures such as deconstructing and connecting, delaying and halting.

In line with this thinking, Bruno Latour interestingly writes, “We have to pass from one temporality to the other, since a temporality, in itself, has nothing temporal about it.”

In Sojung Jun's new work Dream Journey, the artist assembled a vivid, multi-perspectival picture of the area’s spatial, temporal and ecological importance, drawing on Mongyudowondo, a 15th Century painting based on a Korean Prince’s dream telling of a journey into a land of peach blossom trees.

The court painter An Gyeon’s (c.1440-70) painted 'Dream Journey to the Peach Blossom Land' (Mongyudowondo) in 1447. The ink on silk painting depicts a dream of Prince Anpyeong [Yi Yong] (c.1418-53), who also patronised the work, and is the only well-documented extant example of early Joseon period landscape painting. Most other surviving paintings from this time are anonymous, lacking titles, seals, inscriptions, or signatures.

As a close collaboration between patron and artist, the painting affirms both the authority of Prince Anpyeong, a powerful supporter of the arts, and the transformative skills of An Gyeon. The hand-scroll also attests to the deep knowledge of and appreciation for literary and artistic traditions, especially Chinese, shared by a broad spectrum of the cultural elite of the period.

“An Gyeon’s brushwork is the best in the world, what he accomplishes with the stroke of a brush in ink painting is truly admirable.” - Seo Geojeong, 1420-88

“As for the Hogun An Gyeon, he is clever, smart, meticulous, and knowledgeable. He learned all the skills of painting through the study of ‘old masters’ paintings.’ He was good at landscapes. There are no other painters who can compete with him, including all painters of the past.” - Sin Sukju

“An Gyeon’s landscape reached the level of the ‘divine class’. People these days treasure An Gyeon’s paintings like gold or jade.” - Seong Hyeon, 1439-1504