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CIRCA:
Can you recommend some critical readings for our audiences?

CULTURE ART SOCIETY (CAS):
Poetics of Relation (1990) by Èdouard Glissant (a personal favourite that continues to inspire CAS’s work greatly)

Archive Fever: Uses of the Document in Contemporary Art (2008) by Okwui Enwezor Reconstruction Work: Images of a Post War Black Settlement (1984) by Stuart Hall

The Invention of Women (1997) by Oyèrónkẹ́ Oyèwùmí Discourse on Colonialism (1950) by Aimé Césaire

Our Sister Killjoy (1977) by Amaa Ata Aidoo

Naming our Destiny (1989) by June Jordan

African Cinema: Politics and Culture (1992 ) by Manthia Diawara

So long a Letter (1979) by Mariama Bâ

Cemetery of Mind (1999) and House of Hunger (1978) by Dambudzo Marechera

Venus in Two Acts ( 2009) by Saidiya Hartman

Plantation Memories: Episodes of Everyday Racism ( 2008) by Grada Kilomba

A map to the door of no return (2001) by Dionne Brand

The Fortunes of Wangrin (1987) by Amadou Hampaté Bâ

To add: a film is as much a critical reading and text, as the literary form is! Check out several African Cinema and Black diaspora films freely on CAS’s film list.

WORKS:

,, Adama Jalloh, 2020:

Sa-rah is an Islamic custom within the Sierra Leonean community that involves Imams praying for someone’s deceased family member or friend. Offerings of traditional food take place and condolences are expressed. Matching fabrics (known as Ashobi) are allocated to the gathering and individuals in attendance style the fabric to their taste. Having grown up in a religiously mixed household Jalloh was interested in the practice as shared and attended by many Christians who still choose to practice this element of their Islamic faith after their conversion to Christianity. The work is very much about this interchange and cross-over of religious customs.

Love Story, Adama Jalloh, 2020:

Love Story focuses on Adama’s relationship with aspects of London and her admiration for the beautiful subtleties she comes across in Black communities. Aunties and their children in their best attires on a sunday, school children owning the streets after 3.30 on weekdays, teenagers running errands for their mums or someone simply having a moment to themselves. All of these moments are things she wants to glorify because of how closely linked and familiar they are. This on going project started in 2015 and Jalloh continues to document so that an archive is left to look back on.

Identity, Adama Jalloh, 2020:

The project ‘Identity’ is a documentation of black hair salons within South London, focussing on celebrating the versatility of black hair and the beauty rituals that follows with it.